Promote collaboration:

m10Specifically recognizing collaborative achievements can help motivate students, because they see the tasks differently. The dynamics of working together can boost learners’ capacity to reach goals and strengthen their sense of what’s possible and achievable.

For specific examples of how badge systems have promoted collaboration, please see the following pages: group accomplishment and personal badges.

 

Microsoft Partners in Learning Network Badges

Microsoft developed a badge system for the Partners in Learning Network (PiLN) of educators and school leaders to promote technological competencies and relevant skills in today’s digital age. A worldwide initiative, the Microsoft Partners in Learning organization aims to equip educators with the capacity to teach information & communications technology (ICT) and 21st century skills. They argued, “The abundance of knowledge, resources, and accessibility to information available today requires a different approach from the generic one-size fits all engagement models of the past” (DML Stage 1 Proposal). Given rapid technological advancement, the project built a system of recognition and assessment to assist educators in their professional development. The project envisioned the construction of a badge system to recognize educators for their abilities and accomplishments.

Recognizing Principles Assessing Principles Motivating Principles Studying Principles
Mozilla Open Badges
Digital Badges are web-enabled credentials of learning or accomplishment. -Erin Knight, director of the Badge Alliance
Badges contain detailed claims about learning, links to actual evidence of learning, and they're shareable over the web. -Dan Hickey, DPD Project Lead Investigator
To me, digital badges represent the bridge between formal learning & informal structures. -Alex Halavais, DML research competition winner
Open Badges can help people tell a verifiable story about their accomplishments. -Nate Otto, DPD Project coordinator
Regardless of where you start, it’s more than likely you’ll end up somewhere other than your intended destination. That’s okay. Systems are living things, and your badge system needs to be flexible. You must embrace a bit of chaos in its design. -Carla Casilli, Director of Design + Practice at the Badge Alliance