Give human experts badges:

Design Principle A2: Enhance validity with expert judgmentTo recognize experts’ participation in the review process, some projects awarded badge credentials to experts for measuring learning.

For more examples of badge systems using expert judgments, please see the following pages: use AI tutors, use computer scoring systems, use human experts.

4-H USDA Robotics Digital Badges

The 4-H USDA Robotics Digital Badges initiative is a collaborative badging effort between the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 4-H National Headquarters/USDA, and Auburn University. Over the course of badge system development, Auburn University focused on the project’s technical side, while University of Nebraska-Lincoln played a role in developing assessments and curriculum. 4-H described, “The Nebraska faculty has developed an outstanding suite of robotics learning experiences supported through almost $5 million in grants from the National Science Foundation (#ESI-0624591 and DRL-0833403), the NASA Summer of Innovation, and 4-H. These learning experiences will serve as the core content for the 4-H Robotics digital badging system for youth ages 9 to 18.

Recognizing Principles Assessing Principles Motivating Principles Studying Principles

Intel and Society for Science and the Public Badges

Intel and the Society for Science and the Public (SSP) partnered together in an effort to design a badge system that would recognize the accomplishments of middle and high school students worldwide. Specifically, the project awards badges to students for their achievements in scientific research and participation in the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (Intel ISEF) and Intel Science Talent Search (Intel STS) educational programs.

Recognizing Principles Assessing Principles Motivating Principles Studying Principles

NOAA Planet Stewards Personalized Learning in 3D GameLab

Preface The information contained in this project appendix was gathered from the original project proposal that was funded in 2012 and interviews with project leaders through the end of 2014.  This appendix and the overall design principles database from the

Recognizing Principles Assessing Principles Motivating Principles Studying Principles

Pathways to Global Competence: A Badge System for Students

A Hewlett Foundation and Gates Foundation Project Mastery grantee, the non-profit organization Asia Society collaborated with ShowEvidence to develop Pathways to Global Competence. This is a proficiency-based badging system for high school students. The project aimed to engage learners in “powerful, relevant, and self-directed [ways] as they master skills and knowledge enabling them to develop their identity as a global youth leader” (HASTAC). The badging effort aimed to expand students’ cross-cultural knowledge and enhance their understanding of global issues.

Recognizing Principles Assessing Principles Motivating Principles Studying Principles
Mozilla Open Badges
Digital Badges are web-enabled credentials of learning or accomplishment. -Erin Knight, director of the Badge Alliance
Badges contain detailed claims about learning, links to actual evidence of learning, and they're shareable over the web. -Dan Hickey, DPD Project Lead Investigator
To me, digital badges represent the bridge between formal learning & informal structures. -Alex Halavais, DML research competition winner
Open Badges can help people tell a verifiable story about their accomplishments. -Nate Otto, DPD Project coordinator
Regardless of where you start, it’s more than likely you’ll end up somewhere other than your intended destination. That’s okay. Systems are living things, and your badge system needs to be flexible. You must embrace a bit of chaos in its design. -Carla Casilli, Director of Design + Practice at the Badge Alliance